Chemistry

2003

Teaching Chemistry Using all Theee Representations

Basic and Applied Science
Michael J. Sanger
mjsanger@mtsu.edu

Teaching Chemistry Using all Theee Representations: Develping Computer Animations of Chemical Reactions at the Microscopic Level and Linking Them to Chemical Demonstrations and Balanced Chemical Equations

To develop additional computer animatons for the General Chemistry I and General Chemistry II courses for the fall of 2003. Receiving instruction that uses all three representational levels will help these students develop their ability to think about chemical processes at the molecular level, which is important if they are to survive in a Chemistry classroom.

 

Instruction of Air Pollution Modeling Using Software From the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Basic and Applied Science
Ngee-Sing Chong
nschong@mtsu.edu

The goal of this project is to bring together the ISC-AERMOD and HYSPLIT programs on to my webpage to facilitate the instruction of both. This includes the downloading and installation of both programs, posting of data sources relevant to atmospheric pollution in Tennessee, presentation of tutorials for program usage, and incorporation of tools for visualization of the model output data.

FINAL REPORT FOR INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES DEVELOPMENT GRANT (NGEE-SING CHONG)

Incorporation of Internet-based Seminars for Analytical Chemistry and Environmental Science Education

Summary:

In order to facilitate the instruction of the latest laboratory techniques in analytical chemistry and environmental analysis, Internet-based seminars have been or will be incorporated into CHEM 4630, CHEM 6640, CHEM 7640, and the seminar program of the chemistry department at MTSU. The Internet-based seminars will help students gain proficiency in the operation of sophisticated chemical instrumentation and the methods development in chemical analysis.

One of the biggest challenges in teaching chemistry courses involving laboratory techniques is that the techniques are constantly evolving through rapid advances in instrumentation.  An approach that I have adopted for narrowing the gap between the use of the state-of-the-art techniques in chemical industry and the coverage of analytical chemistry concepts in textbooks is by broadcasting seminar presentations from scientific instrument vendors and chemistry conferences via the Internet. This is a very cost-efficient approach to keep students and faculty informed of the latest advances in their fields.  Instead of requesting travel expenditures from the university to attend scientific workshops or conferences, both the live and recorded seminars can be delivered to interested students and faculty in one of our master classrooms equipped with multimedia presentation either free of charge or for minimal registration costs.

I have focused on the Internet-based seminars from Agilent Technologies first because the chemistry department at MTSU currently owns several instruments from the company. Based on positive response of my students the Internet-based seminars, I am arranging to have the seminars incorporated into the departmental seminar series so that even students who are not in my class or research group will be able to successfully apply the techniques of chemical analysis in their research or future jobs.  From the feedback of students, the preparation of a seminar abstract and the hosting of a post-seminar discussion session will be planned for the future.


2002


Incorporation of Internet-Based Seminars for Analytical Chemistry and Environmental Science Education

Basic and Applied Science
Ngee-Sing Chong
nschong@mtsu.edu

In order to facilitate the instruction of the latest laboratory techniques in analytical chemistry and environmental analysis, Internet-based seminars program of the chemistry department at MTSU. The Internet-based seminars will help students gain proficiency in the operation of sophisticated chemical instrumentation and the methods development in chemical analysis.

One of the biggest challenges in teaching chemistry courses involving laboratory techniques is that the techniques are constantly evolving through rapid advances in instrumentation. An approach that I have adopted for narrowing the gap between the use of the state-of-the-art techniques in the chemcal industry and the coverage of analytical chemistry concepts in textbooks is by broadcating seminar presentations from scientific instrument vendors and chemistry conferences via the Internet. This is a very cost-efficient approach to keep students and faculty informed of the latest advances in their fields. Instead of requesting travel expenditures from the university to attend scientific workshops or conferences, both the live and recorded seminars can be delivered to interested students and faculty in one of our master classrooms equipped with multimedia presentation either free of charge or for minimal registration costs.

I have focused on the Internet-based seminars from Agilent Technologies first because the chemistry department at MTSU currently owns several instruments from the company. The list of seminar topics is available at http//webshop.chem.agilent.com/iccdocs/seminarList.shtml. Based on the positive responses of my students, I am arranging to have the seminars incorporated into the departmental seminar series so that even students who are not in my class or research group will be able to successfully apply the techniques of chemical analysis in their research or future jobs. From the feedback of students, the preparation of a seminar abstract and the hosting of a post-seminar discussion session will be planned for the future. The five seminar titles that have been presented are as follows.

  • "Identification and Quantification of Pesticides Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Selective Detection"
  • "Installation, Care, and Maintenance of Gas Chromatography Columns"
  • "Creating and Using Searchable Spectral Libraries"
  • "Gas Chromatoghraphy Column Selection"
  • "Secrets of Solid Phase Extraction"

The Instructional Technology and Development grant has also provided me with release time to enhance my homepages for CHEM1010, CHEM1110, and CHEM4630. I have added instructional resources from the textbook publisher, application notes from vendors of laboratory equipment, as well as information from professional societies and government agencies such as American Chemical Society, Environmental Protection Agency, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The Internet resources benefit the students by allowing them to learn the contemporary materials at a self-paced schedule and pursue more advanced understanding of topics applicable to their career aspirations. I have also investigated the feasiblity of using the satellite TV facilities for broadcasting chemistry and environmental science topics to community colleges and high school teachers in Tennessee. A proposal outlining the plan of distance education has been submitted to the National Science Foundation. 


2001


Development of New Laboratories Using Graphing Calculators, Computers and Vernier Probes for SCI 100

Basic and Applied Science
Judith Iriarte-Gross
jiriarte@mtsu.edu


1999


The Incorporation of Molecular Modeling in Organic Chemistry

Basic and Applied Sciences
Norma Dunlap
ndunlap@frank.mtsu.edu

Norma will be using her release time to improve the use of the SPARTAN molecular modeling program in Organic Chemistry. With this program students can calculate and visualize various properties such as energy, electron distribution and bond variations. The use of SPARTAN in labs and lectures will help students who are visual learners and also improve the overall quality of the course.

The purpose of this project was to improve the use of the SPARTAN molecular modeling program in Organic Chemistry (Chem 321/322). The chemistry department has recently acquired twelve copies of the SPARTAN program for the students to use in the chemistry computer lab. The program is a Wave function product which allows students to carry out calculations on organic molecules. With this program, students can calculate and visualize various properties such as energy, electron distribution and bond vibrations. These are all topics which we discuss in lecture, but they really come alive for the student through the visualization and animation available in the SPARTAN package. We made some use of the program in the Organic labs in the Spring 1999 semester and the initial response from the students has been very positive.

With the help of the Instructional Technologies Development Grant, I have spent time this summer refining the experiments that were done in the Organic laboratories. Each section now has two Spartan labs which cover stereochemistry and conformation as wen as reactivity of different types of compounds. In addition to the lab experiments, I have been developing modeling demonstrations which can be used in lecture. It takes a fair amount of effort to develop examples which will work quickly and smoothly in the lecture, and which are relevant to the lecture material. Ultimately, I will develop at least one example per chapter, which will amount to twenty-seven examples over the course of the year. I had thought that I would be able to complete all examples this summer, however progress has been slower than anticipated and I have developed the first twelve chapters. This material covers the first semester of Organic (Chem. 321) and introduces the basic concepts of bonding, reactivity and stereochemistry of organic molecules. I have also developed some modeling problems for the students to carry out on their own time in the computer lab. This project will reach about 140 students per year. Evaluation of the success of the demonstrations and labs will be carried out by a student questionnaire at the end of the Fall semester. This will provide feedback and give an idea of how well the program is being received. Also, ideally, the students! learning will be enhanced and this may be reflected in higher course averages.

 

Introduction to Computational Chemistry and Molecular Modeling into the Curriculum

Basic and Applied Sciences
William H. Ilsley
wilsley@mtsu.edu

Ilsley will be developing a set of molecular modeling and computational chemistry labs, and homework assignments to be used in conjunction with Chemistry courses. He intends to develop labs for inorganic, advanced inorganic and group theory courses. He plans to utilize the molecular modeling software acquired by the Chemistry department.


1997


Development of Course Materials

Chemistry
Basic and Applied Sciences
William H. Ilsley
wilsley@mtsu.edu

Developed materials for Group Theory and a proposed course, Modeling and Computational Chemistry.

Two- dimensional and three-dimensional modeling packages were used to develop visual aids for the students. Many of these visual aids were translated into a form that can be made available to anyone via the Internet. In addition, students are being required to use molecular modeling software packages and Internet resources to complete course assignments.