1999

Accounting


Using Donated Software to Develop On-line Testing Web Application and Web Based Announcement Board

Business
Jon Woodroof

Woodroof will by learning the new version of Cold Fusion, state-of-the-art web software donated to M.T.SU. by Allaire Corporation, and implementing real web applications that can be used by students and faculty with the Department of Accounting and the College of Business.


Biology


Integration of Technology in Biology 100 Coursework

Basic and Applied Science
Sarah Barlow
sbarlow@mtsu.edu

Barlow will be developing technology-based activities and assignments for the Biology 100 course. Elements of this project include designing Internet assignments for student research, locating appropriate web sites for group projects, locating ListServs for class subscription and establishing a local ListServ for class discussions.

The Internet provides an exceptional opportunity for students to research topics for individual and group projects. This grant project expands the scope, frequency, and diversity of these opportunities for both Biology 100 Honors and Biology 100 students.

Utilization of ListServs as discussion groups encourage student thought and participation and enhance development of problem-solving skills. Issues related to science such as the social impact of genetic technology provide sources for these discussions. Local ListServs for intraclass and interclass discussions are being established. A search for appropriate ListServs to which students can subscribe is being conducted.

Incorporating internet technology in a course brings a world of opportunities and knowledge to students. Ability to evaluate and utilize web sites as research sources becomes as important as traditional library research skills. Skills developed may be used throughout a lifetime.

In developing internet assignments, activities, and projects for students, each of the following aspects of the project have been completed or are in progress:

  1. Conduct a search for websites which can serve as resources for assignments. (completed and ongoing)
  2. Write assignments in which the student compares and evaluates a diversity of websites for biology. (completed)
  3. Write assignments for student research in genetic technology, social issues related to biological advancements, and ecological issues. (completed)
  4. Establish and maintain local ListServ for student interaction and discussion of biological topics. (in progress)

Remodeling and expansion of the Biology 100 Honors webpage has been completed. Several on-campus and off-campus links have been established. The webpage is available at http://www.mtsu.edu/~biol/honors/biology.html Assignments developed through this project will be available at the above web site after September 1, 1999

 

Laboratory Curriculum Upgrade and Development for Undergraduate Neurobiology, Ethology, and Physiology Courses

Basic and Applied Science
Alice Mills
acmills@mtsu.edu

Alice will be using her grant time to improve and develop laboratory exercises for various courses partly through the use of equipment purchased with funding from the National Science Foundation. These new exercises combined with the new equipment will improve existing lab courses and establish a new lab course for students in Biology and Psychology.

The main purpose of this grant was to provide time in which to set up a lab for use by students in three biology courses, beginning in Fall 1999; the equipment purchase is funded by a grant of approximately $93,000 from the National Science Foundation. The process was anticipated to include: reviewing the available equipment through reading catalogs, talking with sales representatives and colleagues on the phone and via email, and visiting with nearby sales representatives and colleagues familiar with the lab exercises, either here at MTSU or at the vendor's facility. placing the orders and waiting out the long bid process. receiving and testing the equipment. ordering supplies as necessary to practice and develop the lab exercises that will be assigned to students in the fall.  I have not yet accomplished all that I had hoped, but I've made a good start, and plan to submit the completed report at the end of this summer, as I continue to work on the project although the spring semester ended several weeks ago.

A major reason for delays has been that I was unaware how much work needed to be done in simply preparing the room that the lab will be taught in. This room is an auxiliary room off a main lab (116 DSB). For the last decade or so, this room had unfortunately fallen into disuse and become a repository for equipment and supplies that were either obsolete or non-functional. The first order of business was to haul most of this equipment into storage; as we have very little storage space in our building, this was no small task, and as I had to be careful to avoid tossing something that someone cared about, I had to discuss many of the items with other faculty before moving them. Next I had 6 cabinets removed from the walls, because they would have interfered with placement of the new equipment. Then I washed all the remaining drawers and cabinets and vacuumed the room. To complete all these tasks took several weeks. This week the room will be painted and next week (I hope) the computer equipment will be networked by OIT. As our departmental space is woefully inadequate, it was essential that the equipment not arrive until after the room was prepared, i.e., I would have had no safe place to put it.

Prior to preparation of the room, I spent several hours on the phone to vendors, drove out to Pegram, TN, to examine some microscopes, and visited with two microscope vendors on campus. As it is unlikely that I will receive such a large equipment grant again, it is vital that I order the best quality, most durable, and most appropriate equipment available.

As of this writing, all equipment has been ordered and several items have arrived and been checked out for functionality, including 6 computers with monitors and a laser printer. Some items are not kept in stock by the vendors, significantly delaying their arrival. My first priority in the coming weeks will be to set up and check out the new equipment as it arrives, and to get all the remaining supplies ordered and work out a plan for proceeding with practicing the lab exercises. I anticipate that I will spend most of the summer completing this project, in afternoons during the June session after teaching each day, and all day when possible for the rest of the summer


Chemistry


The Incorporation of Molecular Modeling in Organic Chemistry

Basic and Applied Sciences
Norma Dunlap
ndunlap@frank.mtsu.edu

Norma will be using her release time to improve the use of the SPARTAN molecular modeling program in Organic Chemistry. With this program students can calculate and visualize various properties such as energy, electron distribution and bond variations. The use of SPARTAN in labs and lectures will help students who are visual learners and also improve the overall quality of the course.

The purpose of this project was to improve the use of the SPARTAN molecular modeling program in Organic Chemistry (Chem 321/322). The chemistry department has recently acquired twelve copies of the SPARTAN program for the students to use in the chemistry computer lab. The program is a Wave function product which allows students to carry out calculations on organic molecules. With this program, students can calculate and visualize various properties such as energy, electron distribution and bond vibrations. These are all topics which we discuss in lecture, but they really come alive for the student through the visualization and animation available in the SPARTAN package. We made some use of the program in the Organic labs in the Spring 1999 semester and the initial response from the students has been very positive.

With the help of the Instructional Technologies Development Grant, I have spent time this summer refining the experiments that were done in the Organic laboratories. Each section now has two Spartan labs which cover stereochemistry and conformation as wen as reactivity of different types of compounds. In addition to the lab experiments, I have been developing modeling demonstrations which can be used in lecture. It takes a fair amount of effort to develop examples which will work quickly and smoothly in the lecture, and which are relevant to the lecture material. Ultimately, I will develop at least one example per chapter, which will amount to twenty-seven examples over the course of the year. I had thought that I would be able to complete all examples this summer, however progress has been slower than anticipated and I have developed the first twelve chapters. This material covers the first semester of Organic (Chem. 321) and introduces the basic concepts of bonding, reactivity and stereochemistry of organic molecules. I have also developed some modeling problems for the students to carry out on their own time in the computer lab. This project will reach about 140 students per year. Evaluation of the success of the demonstrations and labs will be carried out by a student questionnaire at the end of the Fall semester. This will provide feedback and give an idea of how well the program is being received. Also, ideally, the students! learning will be enhanced and this may be reflected in higher course averages.

 

Introduction to Computational Chemistry and Molecular Modeling into the Curriculum

Basic and Applied Sciences
William H. Ilsley
wilsley@mtsu.edu

Ilsley will be developing a set of molecular modeling and computational chemistry labs, and homework assisgnments to be used in conjunction with Chemistry courses. He intends to develop labs for inorganic, advanced inorganic and group theory courses. He plans to utilize the molecular modeling software acquired by the Chemistry department.


Computer Information Systems


Developing the Network Lab

Business
Jong Sung Lee
jslee@mtsu.edu

Lee will be developing a network lab for INFS 490/590 Seminar in Data Communications and INFS 690 Business Data Communication Management. This network will be composed of two prototype LAN's, each with two client PC's and one server PC. The first LAN will be Windows NT-based and the second LAN will be Novell Netware-based.


Computer Science


Interactive Web Units for CSCI 115

Basic and Applied Sciences
Chirsilla Pettey
cscbp@mtsu.edu

Pettey will be working in conjunction with Thomas Cheatham to develop interactive web-based laboratory exercises for the computer concepts, email and Internet portions of CSCI 115. Interactive web-based testing units for all computer concepts will also be developed in addition to a grading and recording component for each unit. CSCI 115 is a required or recommended computer course for Aerospace, Agribusiness and Agriscience, Chemistry, Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies, Physics, Human Sciences, and Recording Industry.

The ultimate goal of this project is to make the knowledge units covered in Computer Orientation, CSCI 115, available as interactive web documents. Then students who have knowledge or hands-on experience in a particular area can easily prove that they have sufficient mastery of the topic to move on to the next unit saving time for the student and avoiding frustration for both faculty and students. At the same time, students who need more drill and practice will have a "patient" partner who will provide numerous laboratory exercises and as many practice exams as desired.

Providing interactive web-based laboratories requires a server running Microsoft NT, laboratory exercises for the computer concepts, testing units for all the concepts, a grading and recording component for each unit which will allow the student to repeat a quiz (randomly selected questions from a question bank), and a database of questions for each topic. We currently have purchased the server, installed all necessary software, tested, and brought the server online.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes"></span>In addition, the testbank of questions for each unit is completed. A Microsoft Access database has been constructed containing hundreds of questions of all types including: Multiple Choice, True and False, Fill in the blank, Matching and Short Answer. An Active Server Page (ASP) interface is being built to allow the student and the faculty member to interface with the database over the web. Most of the laboratory exercises are completed or are nearly completed. Work on the CGI system for parsing HTML pages, parsing testing units, and for grading interactive exams is continuing. We hope to begin class testing the system in the summer of 2000.

 

Interactive Web Units for CSCI 115

Basic and Applied Sciences
Thomas J. Cheatham
cheatham@mtsu.edu

Cheatham will be working in conjunction with Chrisila Petty to develop interactive web-based laboratory exercises for the computer concepts, email and Internet portions of CSCI 115. Interactive web-based testing units for all computer concepts will also be developed in addition to a grading and recording component for each unit. CSCI 115 is a required or recommended computer course for Aerospace, Agribusiness and Agriscience, Chemistry, Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies, Physics, Human Sciences, and Recording Industry.

The ultimate goal of this project is to make the knowledge units covered in Computer Orientation, CSCI 115, available as interactive web documents. Then students who have knowledge or hands-on experience in a particular area can easily prove that they have sufficient mastery of the topic to move on to the next unit saving time for the student and avoiding frustration for both faculty and students. At the same time, students who need more drill and practice will have a "patient" partner who will provide numerous laboratory exercises and as many practice exams as desired.

Providing interactive web-based laboratories requires a server running Microsoft NT, laboratory exercises for the computer concepts, testing units for all the concepts, a grading and recording component for each unit which will allow the student to repeat a quiz (randomly selected questions from a question bank), and a database of questions for each topic. We currently have purchased the server, installed all necessary software, tested, and brought the server online. In addition, the testbank of questions for each unit is completed. A Microsoft Access database has been constructed containing hundreds of questions of all types including: Multiple Choice, True and False, Fill in the blank, Matching and Short Answer.

An Active Server Page (ASP) interface is being built to allow the student and the faculty member to interface with the database over the web. Most of the laboratory exercises are completed or are nearly completed. Work on the CGI system for parsing HTML pages, parsing testing units, and for grading interactive exams is continuing. We hope to begin class testing the system in the summer of 2000


Developmental Studies


Updating Elementary Algebra Presentations

Developmental Studies
Carol Dawson
cdawson@frank.mtsu.edu

Dawson will be updating presentation software for Elementary Algebra that she began work on in the summer of 1994. She plans on including animation in the presentations and eventually preparing them for use on the World Wide Web.

My work this summer involved 22 presentations using Hyperstudio. These presentations cover every topic taught in Developmental Studies Elementary Algebra. Seven of these presentations are new. The others have been edited for colorization, graphics and animation. Some were edited for easier opening with the current version of Hyperstudio. Others were edited, or copied card by card, to prevent a crash of unknown origin from occurring when they were opened.

This semester I am teaching four sections of Elementary Algebra. I have used one of the presentations every day except the first day of class when a pretest is given. All of these sections are taught in a Master Classroom.

I plan to share these presentations with anyone who wants to use them.

 

Computer Aided Animation: An Instructional Tool for Developmental Studies

Developmental Studies
Meredith Anne Higgs
mhiggs@frank.mtsu.edu

Meredith developed a series of computer-aided animation sequences to supplement presentations in Developmental Studies Mathematics courses. These animations could help reduce students math and technology related anxiety by encouraging self-paced learning and presenting content in an entertaining and engaging manner.

This spring 1999 semester, I was supported by an Instructional Technology Grant. The grant allowed me a course-release time to study computer-aided animations using Director 6. The project proceeded as proposed, and the final product is not only exciting but also encouraging to others in my area.

PROJECT PROCEDURES AND METHODS

The project began with an email request to Developmental Studies faculty to submit topics for animations. Although the response rate was low, the submitted topics were incorporated into a list of freestanding concepts. Algebraic laws and exponents laws were chosen as the final topics. Welcome pages for two different web pages were are chosen as topics. An instructional guide for Director 6 was purchased and studied. Using the expertise of the Digital Media Center, fifteen short animation sequences were created to illustrate the chosen topics. These animation sequences are suitable for use individually as lead-ins for discussion of individual laws and can be viewed from disk as a player, on the Web as a Shockwave movie, or on video. These short sequences were strung together to make a few minute movie which was output to video. The two Web page introductions and the two movies (algebraic laws and exponent laws) were launched on the Web. Finally, players, which do not require Director 6 or plug-ins, were created for PC computers. CD-ROM's were burned of these players along with a READ-ME file.

EVALUATION

The final phase of the project was evaluation and adjustment of the animations. Students in two of my Developmental Studies Algebra classes were asked to evaluate the animations using a Likert scale and free-response survey. Unfortunately, one class could not respond to the survey because the operating system in the Master Classroom could not support the required plug-in to view the Web Shockwave movies. Therefore, only one class completed the surveys (20 students). Students, in general, felt that the animations had educational value---rating the animations overall educational value as a 4.525 on a Likert scale from 1 (least) to 5 (highest). The students also had very useful comments including the following: I would add more background colors....It helps me a great deal to learn visually, so I really liked the · action demonstrated on commutative and distributive laws. It makes learning things easy to remember...I learn best by example-not just lectures-the Web shows (physically) · the steps rather than just telling me what to do. It was fun to watch. It makes learning the material more enjoyable...it incorporates a visual aid, something to keep the students' attention, while learning math. Where asked what they liked best about the animations, students' responses included my voice, humor, colors, and the convenience of Web-based materials. The most common suggestion was to add voice to the exponents movie. I acted upon this suggestion and added voice to the exponents movie before I made the video and burned the CD-ROM's. 


Educational Leadership


Microcomputers in the K-12 Setting: An On-line Version

Education and Behavioral Science
Jay Sanders
jsanders@mtsu.edu

Sanders will be creating documents, instructions, and examples to be used in the on-line version of the SPSE 664 course. This will provide off-campus access to technology for students working full-time at K-12 schools and show them how to integrate technology into their own classrooms.

 

Technology in Classroom SPE 322: Adding a Correspondence Module to a Course Using a 450 Page Web Site

Education and Behavioral Science
Jay Sanders
jsanders@mtsu.edu

Jay will be creating additional documents to use for examples, instruction and illustrations in an existing web page. These will enhance student learning in computer programs and in integrating technology into their own future classrooms.

The project met all of the goals for this grant:

  1. Support procedures that could significantly affect existing courses: This Online section of the SPSE 322 course was added to our course offerings in the Spring 1999 Semester. We had 22 enrolled &amp; 20 completed the course satisfactorily.
  2. Reach large numbers of students: We had 22 students the Spring Semester will offer this Online every semester. This represents about 1/3 of students taking this course each semester
  3. Offer a more flexible approach to instruction that is better adapted to individual capacities needs of students: Of the 20 students completing the course, 6 occasionally attended regularly scheduled classes (other sections) for additional help. Fourteen students used the Internet/email exclusively to complete the course requirements. The course allowed the students much more flexibility than having to attend a regularly scheduled class.
  4. Enable the applicant to use technology to revise, update, and implement materials for an existing course: This format allowed me to update &amp; revised the course material to be adapted for remote use and/or classroom instruction.
  5. Allow the applicant to develop materials for new courses that incorporate the use of technology while enhancing classroom instruction: I developed new materials for the 322 course (Online &amp; regular) that allowed for the increased use of technology in and out of the classroom. The Online course allowed me to give more individual instruction because the assignments were attached to an email message—this allowed the instructor to see the actual student work with all of the formatting attached. For example, in WORD 97, in the regular class I only see a hard copy, but in the Online format I can see all of the actual formatting of Tabs, Tables, exacting spacing, etc.
  6. Expand & improve instructor skills  knowledge related to the use of technology in the classroom: The instructor gained skills in dealing with email attachments and how to effectively use the Internet site for remote student work. In addition to the overall grant goals, I met the Objectives outlined in the original proposal: To create additional documents for examples, instructions, and illustrations for each of the 10  Portfolio Sections. To provide students a workable Internet environment that they can access from any Internet connected computer. To enhance student learning in how to use computer programs. To enhance student learning in how to integrate technology into their classrooms. 

Electronic Media Communication


Utilizing the World Wide Web to Teach and Learn Mathematics

Mass Communication
Marc J. Barr
mjbarr@mtsu.edu

Barr will be completing work begun in the Fall of 1998 as a collaboration with Diane Miller and Andrew Worsey of the Department of Mathematical Sciences. They have been creating a video lesson for the World Wide Web for use by middle grades school teachers and university faculty working with both undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics education.

Technologies Development Grant and the collaborative efforts of Professors Diane Miller and Andrew Worsey, Department of Mathematical Sciences, and Associate Professors Marc Barr and Dennis Oneal, Department of Radio/TV/Photography, a lesson is being produced on video and will be placed on Diane Miller's web page for use by middle grades school teachers and university faculty working with both undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics education. An Investigation with Cubes , illustrates how the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics wants middle grades students engaged in problem solving. The script includes a series of questions asked about cubes, which are built by using smaller unit cubes. The activity can be completed using concrete manipulative materials. However, its transformation to an animated, video presentation makes it much more entertaining and motivational. Its availability on the web makes it more usable by teachers and students. This project began during the Fall Semester 1998 and continues through the Spring Semester 2000. Dr. Miller is script author and project director. Dr. Worsey has created the 3-D graphics models utilized in the lesson and Mr. Barr has done all of the animation, rendering, and video production. Dr. Oneal is adding the audio track to the video. The product resulting from this project will significantly enhance the teaching and learning in three courses in the Department of Mathematical Sciences. These are MATH 201, Informal Geometry for Elementary School Teachers, MATH 332, Teaching Mathematics in Grades 5-8, and MATH 634, Geometry for Teachers.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </span>In addition to being shared with other faculty in the Department, proposals for disseminating information about its creation and use will be submitted to professional organizations including the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education.

The initial timeline was to complete the project by the end of the Fall Semester 1999. Dr. Miller's responsibilities as Faculty Senate President have contributed to an extension of this timeline to the Spring Semester 2000. At the completion of the project, the product will be available for viewing at Dr. Miller's web page.


English


The Experience of Literature

Liberal Arts
Maria Clayton
mclayton@mtsu.edu

Maria will be developing the first online, first semester Sophomore Literature course- Eng 211, The Experience of Literature. This course will allow long distance learners to log on and participate in the same quality of education enjoyed by their on-campus counterparts.

 

Multimedia Classroom Presentation on Cultural and Historical Backgrounds of Literature

Liberal Arts
Rebecca King
rking@mtsu.edu

Rebecca will be using PowerPoint to develop a presentation on 19th-century British Literature. This presentation will include video, CD-ROM's, audio, still photos, and text to facilitate students understanding of differences and similarities between their own experiences and those represented through literature.


Mathematics


Enriching Instruction Through Technology: Implementing the Geometer's Sketchpad into the Math 201 Curriculum

Basic and Applied Sciences
Leslie N. Aspirwall

Leslie used technology to revise, update, and implement new materials for use with the MATH 201 course using Geometer's Sketchpad. He continued work started in the Fall of 1998.

People tend to see new technology in terms of the past--originally, the automobile was a horseless carriage and the radio a talking box. When replacing hand methods by machine methods, you do not do the same job. Hand computing is not the same as machine computing. When the computer revolution is finally over, education will not look like it does now. (Selden, A., &amp; Selden, J, 1993, p. 12)

Introduction

Calls for reform in school mathematics have suggested that new methodologies are needed in teacher education programs. All industrialized countries have experienced shifts from industrial to information societies, shifts that have transformed both the nature of mathematics that students must encounter in their learning environments and the concepts they must learn if they are to be self-fulfilled, productive citizens in the twenty-first century. These social and economic shifts can be largely attributed to the availability of low-cost calculators, computers, and other technology. This project started as a desire to change the learning environment in MATH 201 - Geometry for Elementary School Teachers to more actively engage students in the learning process through individual and cooperative group learning activities centered around the computer as a problem solving tool.

An Instructional Technologies Development Grant from the Office of Instructional Technologies has supported the development of curricular materials that introduce a new computer technology into the MATH 201 curriculum. As part of the project, a series of lesson plans have been developed, piloted, and evaluated that enable the use of The Geometer's Sketchpad in MATH 201 - Geometry for Elementary School Teachers. This dramatically alters the course as students learn through active involvement with The Geometer's Sketchpad. Such engagement by students provides opportunities for discovery-based learning through the creation and manipulation of geometric shapes on the computer. Students experiment with geometrical ideas in an intuitive and dynamic way leading to more widespread understanding of geometry than is possible with pencil-and-paper alone. The Geometer's Sketchpad stimulates these future teachers to explore problem posing and solving in geometry and offers students a new window into geometry. Moreover, The Geometer's Sketchpad has unique advantages: it offers each student a starting point in geometry by connecting with something the student already knows. A central idea of The Geometer's Sketchpad is the idea of. After relationships have been determined, say among points, lines, and shapes, The Geometer's Sketchpad preserves all these relationships even when one of the basic components is dragged, or moved about on the screen by a mouse. For example, a rectangle with diagonals drawn can dragged so that its length is increased. The student can conjecture and then experiment to determine what happens to the diagonals of a rectangle when its length is distorted. Students can investigate relationships, discover new connections, and reason inductively by generalizing from particular examples. Thus, students can generate hypotheses about geometric correlations instead of developing into passive receivers of geometric facts.

Mathematics teacher educators have an incumbent responsibility to utilize computers in their teaching, since prospective elementary school mathematics teachers, as they begin their own teaching practices, model the instruction they receive as undergraduates in mathematics education courses.


Psychology


Advanced Statistics Presentations

Education and Behavioral Science
Dana Fuller
dkfuller@mtsu.edu

Fuller will be developing Power Point presentations for use in a new Advanced Statistics class to be offered in the Fall of 1999. These presentations will present key points of the lecture to students, make it easier for students to see the material, and allow more graphical representation of statistical concepts.

I am scheduled to teach a new, undergraduate statistics course entitled Advanced Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (PSY 407). Ideally, I would like the new undergraduate Advanced Statistics courses to have the following design: key statistical concepts, statistical assumptions, definitions presented via PowerPoint. technical details, formulas, etc. presented using worksheets so the students can work in small groups. Eventually, the worksheets might be placed on the web so the students could use them interactively and get immediate feedback about the accuracy of their results. instructions for SPSS, a statistical computer package, presented using the Web. mini computer simulations to demonstrate sampling distributions in class using the PC. I received three hours of summer release time to develop PowerPoint presentations for presenting key statistical concepts, statistical assumptions, and definitions. My proposal stated that I would develop presentations for each of the following topics: Review of Basic Statistics  Linear Regression Models (simple and multiple) Anova based Models (one-way and factorial anovas) Repeated Measures Anova Models (one-way and factorial anovas) General Linear Model Categorical Data Analysis As of August 23, 1999 I have developed presentations for each of the proposed topics except multiple linear regression. During the development of the presentations, I realized that other topics needed to be presented via PowerPoint as well. In addition to completing presentations for the above listed topics (except multiple regression), I completed PowerPoint presentations for Sampling Distributions and Hypothesis Testing Basic Concepts of Probability Hypothesis Tests Applied to Means Power

My proposal also stated that I would evaluate the impact of using technology in the classroom environment. I plan to evaluate the impact of technology as follows:</p> <ul> <li>Impact of Technology on Student Performance. Each exam will have separate questions for material presented using PowerPoint and material presented using the other mediums. I will compare the students' performance on PowerPoint presented material to their performance on material presented through other mediums (i.e., Web pages, regular lecture, and worksheets). Impact of Technology on Nonperformance Factors. Students will evaluate the use of multimedia in the classroom by completing the attached questionnaire. Thank you for the opportunity to learn more about PowerPoint and to develop the course material for PSY 407. It would not have been possible without the Instructional Technology grant.

Student Questionnaire

Material for this Advanced Statistics class was presented in several ways. I would like to determine the strengths and weaknesses of each method of presentation


Physics and Astronomy


A Technology-Based Pedagogy for First-Semester College Physic

Basic and Applied Sciences
Victor J. Montemayor
vjm@physics.mtsu.edu

Montemayor will be completing designs for interactive spreadsheets and web-based lectures for use in introductory Physics courses. These spreadsheets and web pages will allow professors to utilize lectures for discussions of the course materials and provide students with hands-on and collaborative experience in solving problems in Physics.

The proposal A Revised First-Semester Course for the College Physics Sequence was funded for the summer session of 1999. Much was accomplished towards the goals of this proposal - much, it should be pointed out, that would not have been accomplished without the funding that was provided. The work that was proposed and the degree to which it was completed is summarized below. The proposed work was broken down into four components. This summary of work completed follows suit.

Polish lecture web site and corresponding EXCEL spreadsheet programs.

This work required much more time than expected - as should have been expected. The &quot;polishing&quot; involved much rewriting and planning for this Fall semester in which the entire first-semester offering of the College Physics sequence at MTSU is switched to the new pedagogy. This work went very well. The finished web site can be viewed at http://physics.mtsu.edu/!phys231 .

Determine an efficient means of recording and posting grades on the web.

During the summer I attended the MTSU Instructional Technology Institute workshop on Management of Grades using Web-based CGI Scripts by Robert Dougherty, who is in charge of the (foreign) language lab. I attended this workshop with Dr. Ron Henderson, who is also a faculty member in the department of Physics and Astronomy and the of our departmental server (the home of my course web site). Through this workshop and discussions held after the workshop, we determined to write software that would take grades from a pre-specified format in Microsoft EXCEL and write to an HTML file that would allow the students to access only their grades. As opposed to the method used in the language lab, our method will not store the grades as the instructor's grade book on the web (where they could be altered by industrious students), but rather only written to a file there - they would be stored on the faculty member's own computer in his or her own grade book (which is also being developed in-house). Any changes or updates to the grades would then be loaded into the HTML file, so the student could not access and change his or her grades. The writing of the HTML code will be done by Dr. Henderson, which makes things very efficient for me.

To assemble data from the Force Diagnostic Test administered for the past two years.</b><br> The data from the national assessment instrument called the Force Diagnostic Test have been collected and paired (two tests are given to each student - one at the very beginning of the class, and one at the very end; since not all students complete the course, some time was required to match up tests from the past two years). A database (Microsoft Access) has been designed, but has not yet been completed. The comparison of the reduced data with national results therefore has yet to take place. This work will proceed during the Fall semester of 1999.

To start planning the application of the new pedagogy to the College Physics II course.</b><br> This work has begun, albeit at a very rudimentary level, and will continue in earnest during the Fall semester of 1999. This will be a very non-trivial application. From the initial stages of the planning, it is quite clear to me that this application will result in a very nontraditional coverage of topics as well as ordering of those topics covered as compared to what is currently done across the nation. I am very excited at the prospect of continuing the design and development of the materials to be used in the second-semester of the College Physics sequence. I must admit, however, to a bit of apprehension at starting the work that went into the development and implementation for the first-semester course all over again...